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  Fanboy Comics Interviews the Creators of ‘Worth’ (Roddenberry Entertainment)!


The following is an interview with the writer Aubrey Sitterson, illustrator Chris Moreno, and Roddenberry Entertainment’s Trevor Roth, which is the creative time behind the superhero graphic novel WORTH, which was released today through ComiXology. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Sitterson, Moreno, and Roth regarding the inspiration for the graphic novel, how it stands out from other caped crusader tales, and what is up next for the graphic novel.This interview was conducted on April 11, 2014.

Barbra J. Dillon, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor: What initially inspired you to write this superhero graphic novel, and how would you describe its story? Aubrey Sitterson: The initial core concept for WORTH – a superhero who has to learn what it is to not be super anymore – came from the fine folks at Roddenberry Entertainment, but the things that inspired me came from a variety of sources. A big part of piecing the story together and fleshing out that original idea was deciding to set the story in Detroit, which led to the socially conscious, even revolutionary, counterculture of the Motor City in the late ’60s playing a big, big role. Everything from Marxist politics to protopunk rock ‘n’ roll like the MC5. BD: What do you hope that readers will most take away from the story? AS: One of my big goals in writing WORTH was to bring some subtlety to all the requisite superhero action. I hope that after reading WORTH, folks will be left with some things to mull over and ruminate regarding man’s relationship with technology, how time can pass us by, and the difficulties of communicating with and finding your place in the world around you. These are big, big ideas, and I don’t claim to have any answers – that would make WORTH propaganda, not a story – but I hope the story encourages people to think about these issues a little more.


Click here for the full interview!

Fanboy Comics Interviews the Creators of ‘Worth’ (Roddenberry Entertainment)!

The following is an interview with the writer Aubrey Sitterson, illustrator Chris Moreno, and Roddenberry Entertainment’s Trevor Roth, which is the creative time behind the superhero graphic novel WORTH, which was released today through ComiXology. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Sitterson, Moreno, and Roth regarding the inspiration for the graphic novel, how it stands out from other caped crusader tales, and what is up next for the graphic novel.

This interview was conducted on April 11, 2014.



Barbra J. Dillon, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor: What initially inspired you to write this superhero graphic novel, and how would you describe its story?

Aubrey Sitterson: The initial core concept for WORTH – a superhero who has to learn what it is to not be super anymore – came from the fine folks at Roddenberry Entertainment, but the things that inspired me came from a variety of sources. A big part of piecing the story together and fleshing out that original idea was deciding to set the story in Detroit, which led to the socially conscious, even revolutionary, counterculture of the Motor City in the late ’60s playing a big, big role. Everything from Marxist politics to protopunk rock ‘n’ roll like the MC5.

BD: What do you hope that readers will most take away from the story?

AS: One of my big goals in writing WORTH was to bring some subtlety to all the requisite superhero action. I hope that after reading WORTH, folks will be left with some things to mull over and ruminate regarding man’s relationship with technology, how time can pass us by, and the difficulties of communicating with and finding your place in the world around you. These are big, big ideas, and I don’t claim to have any answers – that would make WORTH propaganda, not a story – but I hope the story encourages people to think about these issues a little more.

Click here for the full interview!

comicsalliance:

INTERVIEW: SCOTT SNYDER ON ‘BATMAN: ZERO YEAR – DARK CITY’, PART 2
By Chris Sims

Scott Snyder: There have been so many terrific variations on that idea of Gordon being incorruptible that, again, I thought it would be more interesting here if he was vulnerable and human about the choices he had to make. He’s not on the take, it wasn’t a decision that he made where he was deliberately failing at his job or turning a blind eye because he wanted gifts or money, it’s that he wanted desperately for the city to be what he hoped it would be. He wasn’t able to look at it for what it really was for a brief moment, so he does fail in that regard.
The challenge was to try to take all these elements and do them in a way that felt personal to me. I could really relate to hte idea of a Bruce who trusts nobody, who’s in it just himself, and is this angry, rebellious punk vigilante who’s just basically like “I’m not trusting anybody, especially this asshole. He wasn’t there the night my parents died.” The lesson that Bruce needs to learn there, for me, is poignant. It hits a nerve, personally. So I felt that would be the best way to go with Gordon here, even though it means rolling back some of the stories that I adore.

READ MORE

comicsalliance:

INTERVIEW: SCOTT SNYDER ON ‘BATMAN: ZERO YEAR – DARK CITY’, PART 2

By Chris Sims

Scott Snyder: There have been so many terrific variations on that idea of Gordon being incorruptible that, again, I thought it would be more interesting here if he was vulnerable and human about the choices he had to make. He’s not on the take, it wasn’t a decision that he made where he was deliberately failing at his job or turning a blind eye because he wanted gifts or money, it’s that he wanted desperately for the city to be what he hoped it would be. He wasn’t able to look at it for what it really was for a brief moment, so he does fail in that regard.

The challenge was to try to take all these elements and do them in a way that felt personal to me. I could really relate to hte idea of a Bruce who trusts nobody, who’s in it just himself, and is this angry, rebellious punk vigilante who’s just basically like “I’m not trusting anybody, especially this asshole. He wasn’t there the night my parents died.” The lesson that Bruce needs to learn there, for me, is poignant. It hits a nerve, personally. So I felt that would be the best way to go with Gordon here, even though it means rolling back some of the stories that I adore.


READ MORE

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jenniferdeguzman:

fantasticgirlreadscomics:

Once upon a time Matt and Chip made a beautiful cover for the 4th printing of issue #1 of Sex Criminals. This beautiful cover captured the imagination of brimpers everywhere, including myself and my lovely coworker Heather (@girlblunders). The situation has since escalated nicely.

Welcome to Brimpception!

Brimpe en abyme

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comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: ARTIST ALISON SAMPSON
In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”
Architect and artist Alison Sampson is relatively new to the world of comics, but has done work for both IDW Publishing and Image. In addition to her Image one-shot Genesis with writer Nathan Edmondson (on sale this week), Sampson is also working on the comic Winnebago Graveyard with writer Steve Niles for Black Mask.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: ARTIST ALISON SAMPSON

In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Architect and artist Alison Sampson is relatively new to the world of comics, but has done work for both IDW Publishing and Image. In addition to her Image one-shot Genesis with writer Nathan Edmondson (on sale this week), Sampson is also working on the comic Winnebago Graveyard with writer Steve Niles for Black Mask.

READ MORE

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The First Instagram From Space Is Of An Astronaut In A Firefly T-Shirt - via io9.com

Last week, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson sent the first Instagram from space. It was a selfie, naturally, taken before the ISS cupola. But what caught our eye wasn’t Swanson’s handsome mug or the view of Earth. It was Swanson’s shirt, which features a familiar spacecraft and the words: “Shipping & Logistics: Everything’s Shiny.”
This isn’t Swanson’s first turn as a Browncoat in low Earth orbit. During his first ISS mission in 2007, he brought with him Firefly and Serenity DVDs and left them aboard, a contribution to the space station’s library.

The First Instagram From Space Is Of An Astronaut In A Firefly T-Shirt - via io9.com

Last week, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson sent the first Instagram from space. It was a selfie, naturally, taken before the ISS cupola. But what caught our eye wasn’t Swanson’s handsome mug or the view of Earth. It was Swanson’s shirt, which features a familiar spacecraft and the words: “Shipping & Logistics: Everything’s Shiny.”

This isn’t Swanson’s first turn as a Browncoat in low Earth orbit. During his first ISS mission in 2007, he brought with him Firefly and Serenity DVDs and left them aboard, a contribution to the space station’s library.

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